Depression Success Story: “Art Heals the Mind, Body and Soul”

Contributor: Guy Hoffman. Guy is a full-time Florida-based artist and the founder of OmArtist.com, a blog dedicated to showcasing people who are creative with a purpose. Guy is an energy artist who creates figurative and abstract art with healing energy infused in each piece as he creates them. You can see Guy’s work on Instagram by following @creative365 as well as visiting GuyHoffmanArt.com.

My depression existed long before I recognized it. Here’s the short version of how it came to be.

First came my divorce in 2009. Shortly after that, in 2010, I became the caretaker for my mom who had a number of health issues. In 2013, about the third year into caring for my mom, I realized that something in me had changed. There were many times I felt that I was constantly moody, impatient and resentful, especially towards people in my family for not helping me with the care of my mom. I was sad, I felt alone and the things I loved doing (art, meditation, gardening, etc.) were dropping away quickly. I think that was the beginning for me but I hadn’t recognized it yet. In my head I just didn’t have time for anything else and when I did I was too exhausted to care. This would continue to get worse until 2016.

What happened next was my biggest fear come true. In December 2015 my mom was diagnosed with Stage Four cancer. We were devastated. It was a week before Christmas and we carried on with our family traditions for the holiday, trying to make the best of the situation, but the reality was a lot to take for my mom and quite frankly for me, too. I watched her decline very quickly and the medical system had me so disappointed and so discouraged.

Cancer didn’t end up taking my mom from us. On January 22, 2016, she had massive stroke. She never regained consciousness and passed away the next day.

It wasn’t but a few days afterward that I fell into a darkness. Once all the medical equipment was removed and the house was quiet again, I was lost. I had been a caregiver for so long and now I was free of that responsibility. It was a blessing and curse.

I felt the initial relief of no longer having such an emotional and time-consuming care regimen but in the emotional mix, too, was the need to get used to all this time and quietness. A week later a friend asked me if I was okay. He said, “You haven’t been yourself for a long time. You haven’t created, written or photographed any work in so long and now you’re so sad, man. You need to get back to creating. You need to find your passion again and start healing.” Of course, he offered me any help I might need.

At first I didn’t listen to this advice. I was wallowing in my sadness. My dad had passed in 2010. I had this alone feeling that I can’t explain. My parents, the people who created me, were gone. My work at my job suffered. My physical health was declining.

In March 2016, six weeks after my mother’s passing, I decided to take a much-needed vacation from work. It was during that vacation that I connected with something in me that began the healing process. I felt like I needed to try to get back to some old practices and if I couldn’t make a change on my own I would need to get help.

I began to research natural and holistic practices that might help my depression. I improved my diet. I looked to nature for some help. There was some improvement. If I had to identify a turning point it would be sitting on a hill over looking a farm on a rainy day. I had been hiking and stopped to rest. I had been writing in a journal and I took it out and placed under my jacket to keep it dry while I thought about my next entry. Then, for whatever reason, I began to speak out loud. This speaking became an emotional conversation with my mom. I cried, then cried some more. This was the start of my healing. I could clearly identify how I was not living authentically. I knew what toxic things needed to be removed from my life in order to get healthy.

My recovery plan was to return to living in the moment. Mindful practices were the way forward for me. I resumed many of the practices that I had abandoned while being a caregiver. Along with exercising and eating right, I started meditating again. On a bad day I might meditate many times throughout the day.

Four months later I quit my high-paying but highly stressful job and returned to my creative practices. This is something that I am so grateful for. Art heals the mind, body and soul. I’m a testament to that.

For me, creativity plays a role in keeping me balanced. That depression I left behind still lives in me. If I deprive myself of creativity, I can feel it creeping back in. When my depression was at its worst, I was lucky
enough to realize that creativity would, at the very least, help me feel better in the moment. Then, when I returned to my creative practices I felt alive again. Without it I felt as though I had been missing this thing that I couldn’t quite put my finger on until I began to create again.

Today, my daily creative time is spent around drawing, painting, photography, writing poetry and many other creative practices that speak to me. I’m an explorer of creativity. For me there is a spiritual element to
being creative. There is a meditative quality to it that brings me joy. What better way to balance the darkness of life, than with the light of joy! What better way to live in the moment than to be fully engaged in the “thing” you are creating. I have used my art to express the nagging stuck emotions as well as the surprises of this beautiful life. In both cases I feel the benefits of creativity.

No one’s life is perfect, so whether I use my creativity to release darkness to allow my light to shine or just to express how grateful I am to be living a life that is authentic to me, either way I am left with this feeling of being grounded or balanced. For me that is what pulled me out of my depression. That is what continues to teach me how to balance all of the emotions, feelings, expectations and disappointments that I experience in
my life.

I think every human has the innate ability to create. Even those who say or think “I don’t have a creative bone in my body”. People often want to narrow creativity to just drawing or painting but it has many forms. Everyone can find a creative endeavor to dedicate time to, such as cooking, decorating, art, music, photography, writing, crafting, coloring, gardening and on and on! There are so many ways to be creative, we simply need only try a few to see what we connect to or what makes our heart sing. That is the true power of creativity. It teaches us patience, acceptance, concentration, and it keeps us fully in the moment, to name but a few benefits. The lessons are endless but so is the feeling of joy once you find which creative practice really makes you feel alive. What makes me feel alive is to explore all things creative!

My healing began in March 2016 and continues today. I am aware enough now to know the difference between healthy thoughts and thoughts that can damage my healing. I know in my heart that the practices I do daily have everything to do with living healthy and depression-free but more importantly I know that the practices and the creativity are the way I live authentically. As long as I live in this authentic way I feel healthy and strong to take on any of life’s challenges as they come.

“Man will begin to recover the moment he takes art as seriously as physics, chemistry or money.” ~ Ernst Levy

Guy

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

Spiritual Practice for Depression: On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective is the “Zero Limits” Method?

There’s a fun spirituality book called Zero Limits by one of the speakers featured in the movie The Secret. It’s by law of attraction writer (and super nice guy–he once called my friend to tell her he liked her book) Joe Vitale. Maybe you’ve heard of it.

The book is autobiographical–more a memoir than a traditional self-help. I love a good memoir, and it’s an entertaining read. But even better, it’s practical; it gives an in-depth explanation of a New Age/New Thought-type process for altering your state of mind and your beliefs (and maybe your reality, too). I’ll get into that in a second, but first, a brief assessment for those of you who already know the book.

Does this spiritual practice work against depression?

Yes. As a technique to deal with depression, Zero Limits can be awesome. I’ve tried it with some decent results. But be warned: the process is very similar to just saying mantras, and personally I’m not convinced these mantras are particularly special.

Have you tried it? For how long?

Yes. Not for long, though. Just a few days.

What were your results?

The first time I read Zero Limits, I was super excited. I wrote about this already, in You’re Getting Closer. That first night, I said the phrase over and over, and as I did so, my mood lifted and my head cleared. I entered into the state of meditation and stayed there.

The next day, however, the effect lessened considerably, even though I continued the practice. I decided that my belief in the technique, rather than the technique itself, had been responsible for my results. Since then, I’ve used the method just a few times, and never with the same commitment.

Personally–and this is just my opinion–I’d be more inclined to use the Zero Limits method on a specific situation or physical need, rather than as a way to heal depression. When I repeat a mantra in order to break out of a bad mood, I often end up more frustrated than when I started.

Is this spiritual practice enjoyable, though? Is it easy?

Yes and yes.

How does it work? What do you do, exactly?

Though there are other aspects to the technique, the main activity is repeating four lovely statements as often as possible–continuously?–throughout the day. They are:

  1. I’m sorry.
  2. Please forgive me.
  3. Thank you.
  4. I love you.

I won’t go into the philosophy behind the choice of statements here; for that, you can read the book. (And I recommend that you do.) The basic idea is that the statements have a cleansing power and can help you resolve any undesirable situation–like depression. By using them and visualizing a cleansing action (such as an eraser erasing a chalkboard), you rid the program from your mind that created it or brought it into your experience.

What’s the up-side?

Like I said, it is enjoyable. And it’s easy. And if you stick with it, you’ll likely see results. I happen to prefer other practices, that’s all.

What’s the down-side?

The book claims that the method is a version of an old Hawaiian healing tradition called Ho’pononpono. However, it’s significantly different from that tradition–a spinoff created by a kahuna named Morna. I’m sure Morna is or was inspired and wonderful. But I would’ve preferred she give her method a different name from the original.

The legend of the book and part of what makes it so popular is that Hew Len, the co-author of the book and of the method, emptied a mental ward of patients by using this method–nothing else.

What’s the bottom line? What is your overall rating for this spiritual practice?

As a technique to deal with depression, I give the Zero Limits method a 5 on a scale of 1-10.

Where can I find out more?

You can read my book summaries and takeaways here:

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: Zero Limits: The Secret Hawaiian System for Wealth, Health, Peace, and More by Joe Vitale and Hew Len

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: At Zero by Joe Vitale

Or you can find the book and info about Joe Vitale and co-author Hew Len here:

Zero Limits on Amazon

Joe Vitale’s Official Website

Hoʻoponopono and Hew Len on Wikipedia

Hew Len’s Official Website

Joe Vitale’s law of attraction success story: “I am rich

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

 

Spiritual Practice for Depression: On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective is Mindfulness Meditation?

Mindfulness isn’t what I had in mind. Here’s what I mean.

Right now, as research for this site, I’m reading Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat-Zin for the first time. Now a modern classic, this gives one of the more detailed, systematic (even medical) approaches to mindfulness meditation. It’s based on the successful hospital classes led by Kabat-Zin many years ago, with more recent additions in the revised version I’m reading. I’m also reading several books by Thich Nhat Hanh right now, and listening to an Eckhart Tolle audiobook. I didn’t think of Tolle as a mindfulness meditation teacher, but I’m seeing now that he is (though he might not appreciate the label).

Previously, I viewed mindfulness as a sort of bland, unoriginal approach to spirituality. I mean, it’s just so popular, right? Even non-spiritual people are doing it. After doing the above reading, though, I changed my mind.

Mindfulness, it turns out, isn’t what I thought it was.

I thought mindfulness was: Enjoying life.

Mindfulness is: Being aware of and accepting whatever thoughts come, whether or not they’re thoughts of enjoyment and appreciation.

I thought mindfulness was: Thinking pleasant thoughts about the ordinary things you see around you as you go throughout your day.

Mindfulness is: Feeling your “inner body,” as Tolle calls it–bringing your attention to the energy within you throughout the day.

I thought mindfulness was: Eating more slowly. Listening more carefully.

Mindfulness is: Being who you are. Doing what comes naturally to you when you’re acting from your highest self.

I thought mindfulness was: Not future-thinking. Not past-thinking.

Mindfulness is: Using your mind in the ways that it serves you. That includes some future- and past-thinking.

I thought mindfulness was: Being in a state of deep acceptance of what is.

Mindfulness is: Being in the state of meditation. Even when you’re not totally able to accept what is.

I thought mindfulness was: A politically correct alternative to more advanced ways of meditating.

Mindfulness is: As advanced as I ever need to be.

In other words: Before, mindfulness seemed to me both overly simplistic as well as impossible to achieve. Now, it seems to be exactly what I already do every day: meditating, appreciating, loving. Rinse, repeat.

Does this spiritual practice work against depression?

Yes. For sure. Probably for everyone.

Have you tried it? For how long?

Possibly the main takeaway I got from my recent reading is that I’ve actually been practicing mindfulness meditation for at least four years now. I don’t do many long sitting meditations these days, but my main spiritual practice is to enter into a state of meditation–just a behind-the-scenes sort of sensing of the Divine–in the morning and to hold that place throughout the day. I certainly don’t always succeed in this (read You’re Getting Closer to see what I mean). But when I fail, I return. It’s my most consistent spiritual habit, and as it turns out, it’s nothing special–just what everyone is talking about: mindfulness.

What were your results when using mindfulness for depression?

At times, total transformation of my mood, immediately. Other times, frustration due to just not feeling it.

Is it easy?

For me, yes and no. It does take work, especially for the first several years of practice. It’s a tough habit to create and keep.

How long does the effect last? Does it keep working or does the effect taper off after a few weeks or months?

The mood effect does not taper off at all for me if I practice consistently throughout the day, week or month. And after a break–even a long one–I can pick up right where I left off.

How does it work? What do you do, exactly?

The answer to this question is different for everyone; there are so very many ways to be mindful.

For some, mindfulness is simply noticing what is and thinking thoughts of appreciation. For others, it is noticing unhelpful thoughts and letting them pass, turning their attention to their present surroundings instead. Right now, for me, my main mindfulness practice is to say a mantra many times throughout the day, as follows: I am sensing my inner body. I’m doing what feels deeply right. This reminds me to come back to myself, then check in with my intuition when making any kind of decision. It works wonderfully for me.

I also say, Thank you, God, and There is time for that, too. (This last because of my Type A accomplishment obsession.) And since I’m not so great at just thinking about trees or children’s smiles or whatever, I think thoughts of appreciation about these things. In other words, instead of saying to myself, Here are the trees. They are green and beautiful, I might say something like, I so appreciate these trees. I am so lucky to live here.

Does that make sense? For me, this subtle difference is huge.

Is this practice scientifically backed?

Yes. There are many books on the benefits of meditation in general, but mindfulness meditation is particularly well-researched. It is used outside spiritual circles–in hospitals, therapy practices and much more.

What’s the downside?

None that I can think of, except that it may take years and years of practice for it to feel natural and easy. At least, it did for me. And I definitely still struggle.

How effective do you think it is against depression? What is your overall rating?

For depression, I give it mindfulness meditation 10 on a scale of 1-10.

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

50 Spiritual Practice Success Stories

Success stories: Far and away my most popular posts on this blog. Not only are they inspiring–they can be instructive, too.

And so, in addition to the 150 Law of Attraction Success Stories as well as the Depression Success Stories on this site, I offer this more general list. It includes stories of people who have used a variety of spiritual practices to grow as a person or to gain or achieve something of value to them. Enjoy, and please pass on your own story for me to add to the list. (I’m not quite to fifty yet.)

50 Spiritual Practice Success Stories

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “Affirmations are helping my son cope with Asperger’s

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I paid off my mortgage in under ten years

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I kicked the binge eating habit

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “My eczema is nearly gone

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I learned to love myself

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I’m happy again

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I am a happy person

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “Today, I will not be anxious

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I have everything I need

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I am inspired

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “My life is just about perfect

Spiritual Practice Success Story: From convicted felon to respected author

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I live in the easy world, where everything is easy

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I’ve gone to the next level spiritually

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I learned meditation

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I am deeply at peace

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I’m definitely not shy anymore

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I learned how to meditate

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “My house got clean–fast

Spiritual Practice Success Story: Roger Bannister’s famous run

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “My late friend spoke through me

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I learned to love what is

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “It is good

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I am happy

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I am writing again

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I’m a better dancer–and a more accepting person

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “My days are smooth and calm

Spiritual Practice Success Story: “I have a housekeeper

Spiritual Practice Success Story: Linda Proctor’s road to wealth

Spiritual Practice Success Story: Jack Canfield on the power of belief

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

Depression Success Story: “Depression is Like Alcoholism”

Contributor: Ingrid Vasquez. Ingrid is a freelance writer based out of Texas. She has contributed to Fox News and Cosmopolitan.com.  I interviewed her over email after seeing one of her articles online about depression. You can start a conversation with her, too, at byingridvasquez@gmail.com, or at @byingridvasquez on Twitter.

Mollie: How did your depression begin?

Ingrid: In high school I was a happy student. I wasn’t the popular kid, but I had a tight group of friends who I could depend on for anything. My life at home, though, wasn’t the best.

From a young age my parents never had the greatest relationship. It was a “stay together for the kids” type of thing. Also, we had money problems. I have memories of being told I was going to have to eat everything at school because we might not have enough money for food at home, but at the time it felt normal. In a way I’m blessed to say I was never truly made aware of everything we were going through because my parents would figure it out for my two siblings and me one way or another. I guess you could call this being sheltered.

But because of this, moving away from home was terrifying. It wasn’t that I missed home (as my family believed). I just couldn’t adapt to change and the things that were supposed to be so natural to me weren’t. I started to become afraid to talk to people.

I began my first semester of school just going through the motions. I wasn’t comfortable enough to leave my dorm room. I managed to go to all my classes but I couldn’t study. I went from being an A and B kid to being put on academic probation.

What truly became the breaking point was when I began feeling like everyone around me was looking at me all the time. I felt like each person that walked by me as I was walking to class was talking about me. Even if I sat in the back of the room I felt like people were somehow talking about me.

I stayed in contact with my friends from back home but depended on the workers in the school cafeteria to be my “social contact of the day” because they were literally the only person I would talk to. I don’t have many memories of speaking with my professors.

Mollie: How did this finally start to turn around?

Ingrid: Eventually, I decided to start therapy. I’m not sure what finally made me seek it out. I think at one point I was just walking by the building and decided to go in. However, once I began, I got very attached to it. I hated that it was only once a week because in my eyes, these were the only people who I could speak with and who wouldn’t judge me.

I got clinically diagnosed and was advised to take pills but decided on a different approach. Each week I attended my individual therapy session, two group sessions, and a yoga and meditation session.

The moment I felt a switch was one day late in my first semester when I was walking to my dorm listening to Andy Grammer’s “Keep Your Head Up”. Somehow, listening to those lyrics and someone literally saying “keep your head up” made me feel like someone had pulled a switch in my mind. I had a sort of out-of-body experience where I said, “What am I doing?”

After that, I continued going to therapy for two more years. I got steadily healthier. I started making friends, which helped, too.

Mollie: Are you still depressed?

Ingrid: While today I can tell you that I am not depressed, I like to refer to depression as a disease sort of like alcoholism. You’re going to have your relapses and boy have I had mine. But I can talk to people now, even though I’m still incredibly reserved.

I am in recovery.

Mollie: Is spiritual practice part of your recovery?

Ingrid: Yes. I still meditate twice a day for twenty minutes each time, as I did during my college years. From time to time I use incense cones during my meditation sessions, too. I’m also experimenting with healing stones.

Mollie: How do you feel during your meditation sessions?

Ingrid: It might be odd to say, but I feel out-of-body. I’m able to let go of everything else and just concentrate on me.

Mollie: How important is it to your mental health to keep up this practice?

Ingrid: People often say “go pamper yourself” and see that as a trip to the spa or going on a shopping spree. Those things are nice and can make any person happy, but meditation is a form of pampering yourself that is not only affordable, but truly your own thing.

Mollie: What do you recommend other people who are suffering with depression or anxiety do first? What is the number one thing that they can do for themselves, if they only feel able to do one thing?

Ingrid: I believe it starts off with therapy. I knew nothing about meditation, yoga, expressing my emotions, or anything else that could help without going to a source that didn’t necessarily have the answers, but could lead me in that direction. It is with that process that you’ll find your best form of medicine.

I understand therapy is such a tricky and scary thing for some people and don’t want to necessarily say that nothing else can be done without trying it, but I do feel strongly about its importance.

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

A big announcement, a little apology. Oh, and a purple cow.

Byron Katie does it. Seth Godin does it. And you could probably name several others who do it, too.

They give away at least one of their books for free.

I read Purple Cow by Mr. Godin recently, and it inspired me in so many ways. It changed my perspective on business, on marketing, and even on life. (A little.) One of my main takeaways: Consider carefully if the primary goal of your art is to make money or to … well, do art. I mean, of course you can do both, but how likely is it, really, that you will make a good living with ebooks?

Marketing writing? Yes. Technical writing? Definitely. And I have enjoyed doing both. But right now, it’s all about the art. Or, more accurately, about the communication.

I want more people to actually read my stuff.

So today, a big announcement: I have decided to make all my ebooks available for free. Not 99 cents. Not a penny. Not a newsletter sign-up.

Free.

I’m starting with the first book in my spirituality memoir series, You’re Getting Closer, and following it up with each and every one of my ebooks in the months to come.

I doubt this decision is permanent. But right now, it feels like the right thing to do. And who knows? Maybe I’ll like it enough to keep it this way forever.

So, starting right now, get You’re Getting Closer for $0.00, and watch for the rest of my books (yes, even The Emergency Diet) to make the switch later on.

The Kindle version is available on Amazon, but if you prefer a PDF version, just email me at mollie@mollieplayer.com. You can also get the Smashwords version if you like.

Okay, so that’s the announcement part of this post. Now, the apology.

To everyone out there who already bought some of my books, I should have done this sooner. I’m sorry.

100 Websites for Free Spirituality Ebooks

I’ve mentioned in this blog before that lists I’ve found of spirituality ebooks are often pretty hard to navigate successfully. It’s a hunt-and-peck operation; the few great books that are free are often hidden under figurative mounds of overly difficult or overly simplistic material. For that reason, I created a list of the Best Free Spiritual Ebooks for Overcoming Depression (or the ones I’ve enjoyed so far, anyway). That said, there are likely quite a few more that I could add to this list, if I took the time to look through what’s available.

If you feel inclined to take on the project, here are a few places to start.

100 Free Spirituality Ebooks Websites:

Top 100 Free Amazon Best Sellers: New Age Religion & Spirituality

Free Nook Books: Alternative Spirituality

New Thought Library: Archives

Free Ebooks from Project Gutenberg: Spirituality

Smashwords: New Free Ebooks

Kobo: Religion and Spirituality

NewAgeBook.com: Free Ebooks

New-Age-Spirituality.com: Free Ebooks

Metafiz Books: Metaphysical and Spiritual Library

Author Marketing Club: Free Kindle Books

FreeSpiritualEbooks.com

Endless Satsang: Free Spiritual Books

Obooko.com: Free Mind, Body and Spirit Ebooks

SpiritualBee.com: Free Spiritual Books

GetFreeBooks.com: Free Spiritual Books

GetFreeBooks.com: Free Spiritual and Inspirational Ebooks

TechSupportAlert.com: Free Books on Religion

FreeBooksForAll.com: Spiritual Books

HolyBooks.com

WebSpirit.com: Free Ebooks

FreeEbooks.net: Religion and Spirituality

Trans4Mind.com: Spiritual Books

PublicBookshelf.com: Spirituality Books

2020k: Religion and Spirituality

A Buddhist Library

Al-Islam

Arthur’s Bookshelf

Author Stand

BiblioFaction

Bibliotastic

BookRix 

Booksie

BookYards: Religion and Spirituality

Bored.com: Religion

Bring The Books

BuddhistELibrary

Centsless Books

ChestofBooks: Religion

Curriki 

Daily Free Books (UK)

Daily Free Books (USA)

DigiLibraries

DivineLifeSociety

Ebook.com.au: Sacred Texts and Religion

Ebook Junkie

Ebooks@Adelaide

EbooksDirectory

Ebooks Free Free Free

EbooksFreeNet

EbooksForAll

Ebooks Library

EbookTakeaway

eReader IQ

eReader Love

eReader Perks

EWTN Libraries

Foboko

Free Audio Books.WS

Free Books.com

Free Books Hub UK

Freebook Sifter: Religion and Spirituality

Free Ebooks Blog

Free Ebooks Daily

Free Ebooks.net: Religious

Free-Ed Net

Free eTextbooks Online

Free Read Feed (UK)

Georgia Download Destination

GoogleBookSearch: Religion

Hundred Zeros CA

Hundred Zeros UK 

Hundred Zeros USA: Religion and Spirituality

iLove Ebooks: : Religion

Internet Sacred Text Archive

Lama Yeshe Wisdom Archive

ManyBooks: Religion

MemoWare: Religion

Merlot: Religious Studies

MetaReligion

Modern Buddihsm

Munsey’sMobile

New World Order Library

Nobooko: Religion and Spirituality

One Hundred Free Books

OnlineBooks4Free: Religion

OnlineBooksPage: Religion

Online Library of Liberty: Religion

Overdrive: Religion and Spirituality

PDF Titles

Religion-Online

Snick’s List

The Book Depository

The Divine Life Society

VirtualReligionIndex

Walking By The Way

WikiSource

Wikiversity: Theology

***

“This is the kind of writing that makes me feel as if I’d sat down with the author on the sofa with cups of tea and we were talking together for hours. The style is so vulnerable …” – Heather 

“I don’t know what to say other than it is the most beautiful book that I have ever read.” – Ashley 

“Really, I am rather speechless.” – Sarah 

“I loved the book!! I couldn’t stop reading it!! It touched me so very much.” – Haydee 

“Player has given a beautiful gift to her readers. I was very touched.” – Celia 

“Player’s chatty style evokes a realism and empathy for the story. One is able to feel her pain.” – Anonymous  

Get What I Learned from Jane on Amazon. 

***

More mystical reading choices:

Best Meditation Books

Best Near Death Experience Books

Best Channelled Books

Best Law of Attraction Books

Best Scientific Spiritual Books

Best Reincarnation Books

Best Spiritual Memoirs

Best New Age Children’s Books

Best Other/Inspirational New Age Books

Free Ebooks for Mystics

Best of the Best: My All-Time Favorite Books for Mystics

150 Law of Attraction Success Stories

 

Author Interview: Do You Agree that Life is a Game?

Thanks to a hunch and a great title, I purchased Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Amazon–and liked it even more than I expected I would. So I wrote the author, Mary-Lou Stephens, to ask if I could interview her for this site and for an upcoming book of mine. She kindly agreed. (And she was even willing to challenge my beliefs below, which I loved!)

Mollie: Right now I’m working on a book about examining and questioning deeply-held beliefs. The top spiritual beliefs I’ve found within myself so far, which are explained further in the book, are: spirituality is good; life is a game; there are no rules; people are holy; absolutes are fine, but certainty is not; happiness is the truth; God is simply reality–nothing more; and acceptance is “where it’s at.” What do you think? Agree or no?

Mary-Lou:

1.    Spirituality is good.

To quote Shakespeare, “There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.” I don’t think spiritual people are better than non-spiritual people or vice versa. Many people live good, happy and useful lives without any sense of spirituality.

2.    Life is a game.

Life is what it is. It’s what we make of it. We get to chose what it is through how we think about it. The word “game” to me is too loaded with meaning. It’s possible to cheat when playing a game, and there are winners and losers. Also, to me, a game is too impersonal, too superficial. Life is an ever-unfolding wonder. Sometimes games are involved. I love playing Scrabble, but life as a game? No, that doesn’t resonate for me.

3.    There are no rules.

I believe in boundaries, good healthy demarcations, but are these rules? No. I believe in working out what makes life better for me and those around me and living within that paradigm. As I mentioned before, when I was growing up in a Christian household I thought I had to obey all the rules to be worthy of love, and there were a lot of rules. I didn’t feel loved, no matter what I did. In 12-step programs I discovered that working the steps made my life a whole lot better so I was happy to keep working them again and again. Working those steps made my life work. With meditation I have found that life flows a lot easier. I don’t work the steps anymore. I have no schedule of spirituality I have to adhere to. I just live.

4.    People are holy.

I do believe that God is in everyone. We are all part of the One. But once again, “holy” is a loaded word so I’m going to disagree with this one, too!

5.    Absolutes are fine. Certainty is not.

There are no certainties, no absolutes. Everything changes, all the time. It’s the nature of the Universe.

6.    We have power.

Yes, we have power. We have the power of choice. We can choose what we say, how we respond, how we spend our time, how we treat others. This is power.

7.    Happiness is the truth.

Totally disagree with this one. Happiness is a fleeting feeling. The truth is everlasting.

8.    God is reality—nothing more.

God is a paradox, everywhere and nowhere, everything and nothing, immeasurable and infinite. God may not even exist. But there is a strong sense within me that s/he does.

9.    Acceptance. It’s where it’s at.

Yep! I love acceptance. it gives me so much more space and time to do the things I love to do. I’ve stopped fighting. It was all useless anyway. In the end, even the victories I had mean nothing. Acceptance brings me joy.

To learn more about Stephens and her work, see:

Mary-Lou Stephens’ Website and Blog

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: “Sex, Drugs and Meditation” by Mary-Lou Stephens

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: “How To Stay Married” by Mary-Lou Stephens

Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Amazon

Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Goodreads

How To Stay Married on Amazon

How To Stay Married on Goodreads

***

Want to learn how to clean your house twice as well in half the time? 

Get The Naked House: Five Principles for a More Peaceful Home on Amazon.

***

More mystical reading choices:

On a scale of 1-10, how effective is positive thinking against depression?

How do you stay in touch with the Divine throughout the day?

How do you love what is when you don’t even like it?

How do you love God, when there’s no face to God?

Is God really in everything? Even poopy diapers?

Is everything really just a projection of ourselves? Even the mean stuff people do?

Best Meditation Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Near Death Experience Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Channeled Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Law of Attraction Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Scientific Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Spiritual Memoirs for Overcoming Depression

Best Other/Inspirational New Age Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Free New Age Ebooks for Overcoming Depression

Best of the Best: My Favorite Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

150 Law of Attraction Success Stories

 

 

Author Interview: How Do You Make Acceptance a Daily Spiritual Practice?

Thanks to a hunch and a great title, I purchased Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Amazon–and liked it even more than I expected I would. So I wrote the author, Mary-Lou Stephens, to ask if I could interview her for this site and for an upcoming book of mine. She kindly agreed.

Mollie: Do you practice acceptance of what is in a conscious way with the goal of greater inner peace?

Mary-Lou: I practice acceptance every day. It gets easier as I get older, or perhaps I’ve just had more practice. I don’t practice acceptance with any goal in mind. I practice it because it’s easier than any alternative I’ve found … and I’ve tried quite a few. Ranting and railing, pushing the river, complaining, playing the victim, playing the star, being a martyr … none of these proved very successful. Acceptance is a much more peaceful way to be. It’s not a goal, it just is.

Mollie: When and how did you begin this practice? How has it affected your life?

Mary-Lou: I first learned about acceptance in 12-step programs. The Serenity Prayer was a revelation to me. I always thought it was my job to change other people, places and things. When I discovered the only thing I could change was myself I felt as though a huge weight had been lifted from me. I didn’t have to be responsible for all that stuff I thought I was responsible for; in fact, I couldn’t be responsible for it and didn’t have any business trying to be. I just let it all go. This gave me incredible freedom. As my meditation practice grew and became stronger so did my ability to be a witness to what was going on around me without having to buy into it. Being able to witness my own thoughts was an amazing breakthrough. I am not my thoughts … which is just as well because they’re crazy!

Mollie: Can you offer any advice to people who would like to learn how to be more accepting of hardship and to use it to their benefit?

Mary-Lou: Don’t blame yourself. Don’t blame your karma. Things just happen. Most times it has nothing to do with you. It’s horrible and it’s hard but it’s not personal. God, the Universe or karma are not out to get you. Learn the lesson and move on. Also, don’t expect to get over hurts or grief quickly. You won’t. And some things will be with you for the rest of your life. Once I learnt to accept that, I was a lot more peaceful. I used to think I had to rise above the bad, forgive everything and everyone, not have any negative thoughts, blah, blah, blah. Now I know I’m not perfect and I don’t expect to be. Some feelings stick with us for a reason–as a warning or as a blessing. Many situations I’ve been through have helped me to relate to others better. They’ve also been beneficial when offering a shoulder or an ear.

To learn more about Stephens and her work, see:

Mary-Lou Stephens’ Website and Blog

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: “Sex, Drugs and Meditation” by Mary-Lou Stephens

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: “How To Stay Married” by Mary-Lou Stephens

Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Amazon

Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Goodreads

How To Stay Married on Amazon

How To Stay Married on Goodreads

***

Want to learn how to clean your house twice as well in half the time? 

Get The Naked House: Five Principles for a More Peaceful Home on Amazon.

***

More mystical reading choices:

On a scale of 1-10, how effective is positive thinking against depression?

How do you stay in touch with the Divine throughout the day?

How do you love what is when you don’t even like it?

How do you love God, when there’s no face to God?

Is God really in everything? Even poopy diapers?

Is everything really just a projection of ourselves? Even the mean stuff people do?

Best Meditation Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Near Death Experience Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Channeled Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Law of Attraction Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Scientific Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Reincarnation Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Spiritual Memoirs for Overcoming Depression

Best Other/Inspirational New Age Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Free New Age Ebooks for Overcoming Depression

Best of the Best: My Favorite Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

150 Law of Attraction Success Stories

Author Interview: Does Questioning Your Thoughts Lead to Greater Inner Peace?

Thanks to a hunch and a great title, I purchased Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Amazon–and liked it even more than I expected I would. So I wrote the author, Mary-Lou Stephens, to ask if I could interview her for this site and for an upcoming book of mine. She kindly agreed.

Mollie: Do you practice questioning your thoughts in a conscious way with the goal of greater inner peace? When and how did you begin this practice? Does it work?

Mary-Lou: Yes. This is what I refer to as “the witness.” I observe my thoughts and decide whether to engage with them or not. This is a benefit of meditation. In meditation I don’t try to stop my thoughts–impossible! Instead, I watch them as they do their crazy dance. The more I observe my thoughts, the more I realise how funny they are. And to think they used to rule my world. No wonder I was so unhappy. I believed what I was thinking was true when most of it is just reaction and craving. Life is a lot more peaceful now and although peace and happiness might have been my goal when I first started meditating I don’t think about goals at all anymore. So many goals are counter-productive.

Mollie: Can you share the specific techniques that you prefer (i.e., journaling negative and positive thoughts, meditation, etc.)?

Mary-Lou: I used to use specific techniques–journaling, meditating at a set time for a set amount of time–but now acceptance, witnessing my thoughts and meditation are all part of my day. I don’t put them in specific time slots. It’s more like breathing. It just is without me having to do anything.

Mollie: What are a few of your foundational spiritual beliefs? If you are non-spiritual, what are a few of your foundational life philosophies?

Mary-Lou: When I was growing up my parents were heavily involved with the Charismatic Christian movement–lots of speaking in tongues and prophesying, healing and excitement. As a child I was very much wrapped up in that world … a world where God was love but also any negative feelings or misgivings were pushed away and ignored. If you felt bad clearly you weren’t praying hard enough. As a teenager I felt bad all the time and so became increasingly disenchanted with those that were reaching to heaven but ignoring what was going on at their feet.

In 12-step programs I was told I could believe in a God of my own understanding. God could be a colour, or the sun or the wind, anything I wanted, just as long as God was a power greater than myself. This was liberating. Slowly, and with a few missteps, I developed a relationship with a God of my own understanding, one that had nothing to do with religion or other people’s beliefs. This God was a God I could rely on, lean on, talk to, be reassured by. I didn’t have to be good for this God to love me, I didn’t have to penance or chant the right prayers, or go to church. This God loved me just as I was, no matter what I did. I’d always tried to be a good girl so that God would love me. In 12-step programs I came to the realisation that God would love me no matter what I did but living a life of good thoughts and actions helped me love and live with myself.

These days, God just is. God is in everything, everywhere, a benign, loving presence. This gives me a sense of peace.

To learn more about Stephens and her work, see:

Mary-Lou Stephens’ Website and Blog

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: “Sex, Drugs and Meditation” by Mary-Lou Stephens

Best Spirituality Book for Depression: “How To Stay Married” by Mary-Lou Stephens

Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Amazon

Sex, Drugs and Meditation on Goodreads

How To Stay Married on Amazon

How To Stay Married on Goodreads

***

Want to learn how to clean your house twice as well in half the time? 

Get The Naked House: Five Principles for a More Peaceful Home on Amazon.

***

More mystical reading choices:

On a scale of 1-10, how effective is positive thinking against depression?

How do you stay in touch with the Divine throughout the day?

How do you love what is when you don’t even like it?

How do you love God, when there’s no face to God?

Is God really in everything? Even poopy diapers?

Is everything really just a projection of ourselves? Even the mean stuff people do?

Best Meditation Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Near Death Experience Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Channeled Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Law of Attraction Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Scientific Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Reincarnation Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Spiritual Memoirs for Overcoming Depression

Best Other/Inspirational New Age Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Free New Age Ebooks for Overcoming Depression

Best of the Best: My Favorite Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

150 Law of Attraction Success Stories