Author: Mollie Player

Mollie Player is a freelance writer living in Seattle, Washington. She is the author of "You're Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends," "Happiness is the Truth: A Spiritual Manifesto," "What I Learned From Jane" and more.

Depression Success Story: “I Altered My Subconscious Beliefs Using the Byron Katie Method”

Contributor: Mollie Player

The story of my depression starts way back in time, back to some of my first childhood memories. Since then I’ve made a great deal of progress–more than I once thought possible. But that doesn’t mean I don’t still have it.

Daily, there’s a routine: Get some exercise, some alone time. Take time to read and write and be with friends. Meditate as much as possible all throughout the day, and never, ever forget to be grateful.

Sleep well, and a lot. Eat healthy. Take medication. Stay busy. Get outside if you can. Take vitamin D, a multivitamin, a cold shower. Then get some more exercise, and meditate again.

Most of the time, this works. It’s work, but it works. So I continue on, and make slow progress. But recently I discovered two techniques that are speeding up my results: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Byron Katie’s The Work.

Elsewhere in this blog I tell more about these techniques for overcoming depression–how to do them, why they work and how well. For this story, then, I’ll just add a few personal examples–particularly difficult thoughts the methods have helped me overcome.

Keep in mind that these are just some of the beliefs, not all, that have altered over the past few months using these processes.

  1. My kids require too much attention. After doing The Work, this thought became: My kids require just the right amount of attention for them. And I require a lot of attention, too–and I get it. Also, much of the day I’m doing other things–cooking, cleaning, hanging out with friends. Things I’d do whether or not the kid were present.
  2. I am sick of breastfeeding. This changed to: I am not sick of breastfeeding. It’s good for the kids. It’s nice downtime for me–I often get to read at the same time. Plus, it helped me lose my extra baby weight. It is a blessing for us all.
  3. I am exhausted. This thought became: I’m not exhausted. I am not depleted of energy. There is a great deal of energy in my body for everything my body needs to do. I am thankful that my body notices when it’s time to sleep, and lets me know.

It’s an interesting process, this thought-altering work. Sometimes I can feel the change in my perspective right away. Other times, though, I only notice the change later, when the situation comes up again.

Every time I do it, part of me doubts it will work. Most of the time I’m surprised.

Byron Katie told me this would happen. I love her so much.

If you haven’t tried The Work yet, start here.

Much love,

Mollie Player

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

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Depression Success Story: “I Let My Bad Feelings Run Free. They Ran Away”

Contributor: Mollie Player

Early last year,  I took a break from spirituality for a while. Have you ever done that? I stopped trying to meditate. I stopped saying my mantras.

I was just sick of it all.

Spiritual practice is wonderful, when it’s wonderful. Other times it just feels like one more obligation. And then I got pregnant, and was sick for three months, and my only unnecessary activity was watching TV reruns. I took care of my family. I ate and slept. But I didn’t exercise or see friends, much less meditate.

Needless to say, this convergence of events brought on a depression relapse. Then November came. My first trimester sickness was over, and I was ready to take up my self-improvement efforts again. So I did something I’d never done before.

I started seeing a therapist.

When I called to make the appointment, the woman asked if I was suicidal. At first I didn’t answer; I just started crying. “No,” I told her. “I don’t want to kill myself. I just don’t really want to live.”

Apparently, that’s what three months without exercise or prayer will do to me. Oh, and dehydration and constant nausea.

In any case. My first appointment was in December, and I left it feeling quite hopeful. Julie told me that depression may be a temperament, a chemical imbalance, something that’s considered permanent. But many therapists believe that it’s not that simple, that there are other factors, too.

“So long-term relief is possible?” I asked. “Is that what you’re telling me?”

“It is,” she said. “A better question, though, is: Is it possible for you?”

She couldn’t tell me for sure if she’d be able to help me feel significantly better for a significant amount of time. “What I can say is that the things we’ll talk about have helped a huge number of other people in your place.”

“So what’s the plan?” I asked. “In a nutshell, what’s the strategy? Do you have some techniques in mind?” Partly, I was curious. Partly, I needed hope. And partly, I was doing a mental calculation, a cost-benefit analysis. With two kids at home, even insurance-covered therapy is a luxury.

Julie laid it out: We’d delve deep into my emotions. We’d analyze incidents that brought up feelings I’d rather not have. In doing so, I’d learn how to face them rather than stuffing them down. I’d also learn to be vulnerable.

“Studies consistently show that the happiest people are those that don’t push down their emotions,” she told me. “Letting yourself feel is the first step.”

And immediately upon hearing this, I knew she was right.

Here’s the thing: Her plan wasn’t anything I hadn’t heard before. Nothing new or revolutionary. But for some reason, until that day, I’d never followed the advice. It wasn’t so much that I was afraid to feel bad. I just didn’t think it’d work. In the past, every time I’d decided to look at my pain, it just seemed to grow bigger.

So, I ignored them—at least as much as I possibly could. And then I tried to fix them, find a solution. But feelings, said Julie, don’t need to be fixed. They just needed to be felt.

A bell rang. A Buddhist bell. An Eckhart Tolle/New Age spirituality bell. All that “just notice the thoughts–don’t judge them” stuff kicked in, and I thought, Maybe the Universe is telling me something. So, soon after reading the books by Brene Brown that Julie recommended, I decided to delve into spiritual books again. I bought Matt Kahn’s Whatever Arises, Love That. And I read Pema Chodron for the first time. These books were all about accepting where you’re at–even when you’re in a bad-feeling place.

I was ready to be spiritual again.

Over the next few months, I resumed my meditation practice, along with my exercise routine. I went to therapy a few more times, too, and that helped more than I thought it would. I can’t say for sure which of these activities was the most significant part of my recovery, though I suspect it was the walking. But the spiritual practice I started with during that sensitive time helped a lot, too, and I still do it now sometimes.

I called it my “I hate this” meditation, and I came up with it one day at the gym.

I’d come there to exercise, of course, as well as do some writing, but I was feeling exhausted and just … bad. So instead of doing either, I sat on a comfortable chair and decided to rest for a moment.

I know what I’ll do, I thought after criss-crossing my legs and taking a few deep breaths. I’ll practice this vulnerability thing. I will think about my emotions. Feel them fully. Stop fighting my negative inner dialogue, and judging it.

I will let my bad feelings run free.

And so, that’s what I did. And not half-heartedly. If I was gonna do this, I was gonna do it right. I started a mental checklist of everything—every little thing—that I was hating in that moment. Anything that came up, I put it on the list.

The list got very long, very quickly.

I hated the gym. I hated cleaning the bathroom. I hated getting my kids ready in the morning. I hated the weather, and the way my pregnant belly felt.

I even hated my own pants.

Then something happened. Something I didn’t expect. The depression began to lift. The thoughts lost a bit of their power, their ability to produce fear. You might even say that by letting them run free, they ran away.

After all, I was facing them, and they weren’t that bad. They were just thoughts, you know? Most of them were unreasonable, many untrue. Some of them were even sort of silly. Suddenly I understood what some people call “the space between”–there was space between myself and my thoughts, like a cushion.

Half an hour into this negativity meditation, I moved past the initial lift and into an actual high. Or, not a high exactly—the depression was still there. But alongside it, coexisting with it, was some peace.

Breakthrough.

For the next two months, I continued my “I hate this” meditation until I didn’t seem to need it anymore. Soon after that, I discovered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Byron Katie … but those stories I’ll save for another day.

You can read more about my “I hate this” meditation here.

Much love,

Mollie Player

***

It’s spirituality for the rest of us

Eckhart Tolle is awesome. So are Byron Katie and all those Buddhist monks we hear about. Why, then, doesn’t their advice immediately solve all our most pressing spiritual problems?

Why are their results so difficult to replicate?

Get You’re Getting Closer and The Power of Acceptance on Amazon.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

Some Spiritual Practices Actually Work. It’s Amazing.

 

The invaluable question: If you’re struggling with depression and looking to spirituality for help, which of the many methods, belief systems, teachers and techniques should you choose? You can’t do them all, after all.

Which is why here, I test the advice of well-known spiritual teachers, then describe (and rate!) my results. My sincere hope is that my personal experiences with these practices has some relevance to your journey as well.

I’ve posted each of these stories individually, and now I’m posting this list for easy reference. It is also located on the Welcome page of my blog.

Many more spiritual practice effectiveness ratings are on the way. Check back here for updates.

Spiritual Practices for Depression

On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective Is Positive Thinking Against Depression?

On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective Is Mindfulness Meditation Against Depression?

On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective Is the “Zero Limits” Method Against Depression?

On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective Is Sitting Meditation Against Depression?

On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective Is Byron Katie’s The Work Against Depression?

On a Scale of 1-10, How Effective Is Mantra Meditation Against Depression?

***

In the year 2081, Francie lived in a small village called Gallitia. It was simple. It was peaceful. It was beautiful. But there was one problem.      

Francie couldn’t leave.       

Oh, and then there were the people that wanted to bring electricity and change everything. And the boy with the very red hair, who Francie suspected was somehow part of this change. The question, then, became: Will Francie change, too?

Get Being Good on Amazon for 99 cents, or on Smashwords for free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

 

I Suspect Inner Peace Is Just a Myth. Here Are Interviews With People Who Disagree.

When it comes to depression, the best advice is often underrated and the toughest questions are often overlooked. Here, interviews with spiritual-but-not-religious authors and other mystics offering practical, been-there-done-that tips on spiritual practice, depression and more. I’ve posted these individually, and now I’m posting this list for easy reference in case there’s something you missed.

Check back here for additions; I’m always looking for more great advice from great people.

Author Interviews

Does Questioning Your Thoughts Lead to Greater Inner Peace?

How Do You Love What Is When You Don’t Even Like It?

How Do You Stay in Touch With the Divine Throughout the Day?

How Do You Make Acceptance a Daily Spiritual Practice?

Is God Really in Everything? Even Poopy Diapers?

How Do You Love God, When There’s No Face to God?

Is Everything Really Just a Projection of Ourselves? Even the Mean Stuff People Do?

Do You Agree That Life is a Game?

What Is Meditation, Really?

What Does Meditation Feel Like?

***

In the year 2081, Francie lived in a small village called Gallitia. It was simple. It was peaceful. It was beautiful. But there was one problem.      

Francie couldn’t leave.       

Oh, and then there were the people that wanted to bring electricity and change everything. And the boy with the very red hair, who Francie suspected was somehow part of this change. The question, then, became: Will Francie change, too?

Get Being Good on Amazon for 99 cents, or on Smashwords for free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

“The Power of Acceptance: One Year of Mindfulness and Meditation” is FREE today on Amazon

The Power of Acceptance: One Year of Mindfulness and Meditation is free on Amazon.com today.

This is a book I am proud of. Here, a review I just got an hour or so ago (from a stranger, in case you were curious) on Smashwords:

“Although this is one woman’s journey to understand mediation’s place in her own life, you’ll swear she is describing you. Honest, sometimes raw, and always down to earth, throughout the entire book I felt as if Mollie Player was the one friend who would truly understand: the struggle, the wonderment, the confusion, and the joy of finally touching the subtle but profound shift in approach to…everything. As well as the frustration of inconsistently sustaining it. The Power of Acceptance is itself a practical mediation. Honestly, if you even paused at the title, let alone read this far, this book is definitely for you. Pull up a cozy mug, curl deeper under that blanket, and join Mollie in an applicable, spiritual conversation that helps you level up your life: we don’t need to seek through meditation — we already are. Meditation practice is what allows us to accept this, and the magic starts happening from there.”

Get The Power of Acceptance: One Year of Mindfulness and Meditation (The Mystical Memoir Series Book 2) for free now.

Much love,

Mollie

Depression Success Story: “I Can Be Happy About My Sadness”

“You couldn’t relive your life, skipping the awful parts, without losing what made it worthwhile. You had to accept it as a whole–like the world, or the person you loved.” ― Stewart O’Nan, The Odds: A Love Story

 

In the journey with and through depression, there are many, many turning points. It’s a spiral: You circle, and circle, and circle, but each turn is actually a move upward as well as back.

One of the turning points that I experienced recently regarding my depression was when I decided to appreciate the experience. Here’s how that happened.

One of the most difficult life situations I’ve found myself was my third pregnancy trimester with my third child. I was exhausted and very moody, and then I decided to take on an extra challenge: potty training.

Both kids needed help with this. Okay, not just help–total teaching. And even before beginning I knew how hard it would be. I knew that this was the time that I’d need to dig deep, really deep, so I could grow from the experience rather than just getting through it. My plan: I would appreciate my hardships.

I had just read Matt Kahn’s Whatever Arises, Love That and I was determined to put his advice to the test. In the book he says that the most profound spiritual practice for him is to meet every situation that comes with one thought: I love this.

So I did. I remember one night in particular after an especially rough day that all I could do was sit out on the front porch, knees to chin, and cry. Well–that wasn’t quite all I did. I also reflected deeply on how much change I could feel happening inside. It felt like a wrenching, but also real change. Real growth. Growth that would not have come without a challenge like this.

At the end of that first week of potty training, I wrote the following journal entry:

Saturday: I am learning so, so much. Not knowledge-learning—really learning. Practicing. Changing my mind. Changing my habitual knee-jerk reactions. More specifically what I’m learning is:

  1. How not to try to fix things all the time.
  2. How to achieve inner peace in spite of turmoil and stress, and in the midst of it.
  3. How not to try to fix things as my first impulse, but to first sit with the feeling, then fix it.
  4. To truly love what is—meaning, to truly accept that my life will never be perfect and is not meant to be perfect, in spite of what some overzealous proponents of the law of attraction would have me believe. It’s not all about changing, fixing, getting, improving. It’s really all about acceptance.

Here is a summary of the past week and a half: poop on kitchen floor, playroom floor, office floor, friend’s floor, and in the bathtub; pee reminders/power struggles every 45 minutes for two kids; pee on every floor; pee in the bed; pee refusal temper tantrums two or three times per day; carpet cleaning; toilet misses; and a stinky bathroom for a week … learning how to say no more often; learning to be stricter and allow and ignore temper tantrums; and learning how to be more consistent with consequences.

What’s strange is that in spite of this, and in contrast to the depression I’ve been feeling so strongly lately, right now I’m happy. All week as the challenges came I took them one by one, and while doing so repeated a mantra in my head: This is the good stuff.

For the first time in my life, maybe, I’m really knowing the value of pain. Really loving the process even though it feels so unlovely at times. I’m realizing that I can be happy, even about my sadness. I am finally achieving inner peace.

Much love,

Mollie Player

“Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don’t resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.” ― Lao Tzu

“For after all, the best thing one can do when it is raining is let it rain.” ― Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“We think that the point is to pass the test or overcome the problem, but the truth is that things don’t really get solved. They come together and they fall apart. Then they come together again and fall apart again. It’s just like that. The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen: room for grief, for relief, for misery, for joy.” ― Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heartfelt Advice for Hard Times

“Once there was a young warrior. Her teacher told her that she had to do battle with fear. …Then the young warrior said, “How can I defeat you?” Fear replied, “My weapons are that I talk fast, and I get very close to your face. Then you get completely unnerved, and you do whatever I say. If you don’t do what I tell you, I have no power. You can listen to me, and you can have respect for me. You can even be convinced by me. But if you don’t do what I say, I have no power.” In that way, the student warrior learned how to defeat fear.” ― Pema Chödrön, When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

What Are the Best Spirituality Books for Overcoming Depression?

new-thought-book-18

It’s a great time to be a mystic. So many teachers, so many books. Here, comprehensive lists of the best spiritual-but-not-religious books for overcoming depression, organized by category. Each book in the “best” category is rated on a scale of 1-10 for effectiveness.

I’ve posted each of these lists individually, and now I’m posting this list for easy reference in case there’s something you missed.

This is an extensive, ongoing project, so check back here regularly for updates.

This list is also located on the Welcome page of my blog.

Best Spirituality Books for Overcoming Depression:

Best Meditation Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Spiritual Memoirs for Overcoming Depression

Best Spiritual/Inspirational Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Law of Attraction Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Channeled Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Scientific Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Near Death Experience Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Reincarnation Books for Overcoming Depression

Best Paranormal Book for Overcoming Depression

Best Free Spiritual Ebooks for Overcoming Depression

Best of the Best: My Favorite Spiritual Books for Overcoming Depression

***

Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

***

More Mystical Reading Choices:

Required Reading

Image from the law of attraction book list featuring all major law of attraction authors at lawofattractionproject.com

Depression and spirituality aren’t the only topics I read about (though, admittedly, they’re my favorite). This blog just would not be complete without a list of all of the books I truly “heart”. And lots of them have helped me become a better, wiser person, too–even less depressed.

I’ve written full posts on some of the books, offering my notes and reactions. If the book title has a link, that’s where it heads to.

Of course, this list is a long one, so I’ve broken it down into sections and linked from this list to the actual book lists. Also know that I will update this list regularly since I’m always reading awesome new stuff.

Though these lists may seem overwhelmingly long, my promise to you is that I won’t put anything on this list that doesn’t truly deserve to be here.

These are all really great books.

Required Reading

Best Nonfiction Books on History
Best Nonfiction Books on Science
Best Nonfiction Books on Politics and Economics
Best Nonfiction Books on Psychology and Sociology
Best Nonfiction Books on Diet and Health
Best Nonfiction Books on Writing
Best Nonfiction Books on Education
Best Nonfiction Books on Marketing
Best Nonfiction Books on Relationships
Best Nonfiction Books on Parenting
Best Memoirs
Best Textbooks and Encyclopedias
Best How-To Books
Best Nonfiction Classics
Other Best Nonfiction Books
All Best Non-Spiritual Nonfiction Books
Best Spiritual-But-Not-Religious Children’s Books
Best Classic Fiction Works

More Words I Love

Best Spirituality Blogs

150 Life Hacks for Overcoming Depression

Depression is such a complex, tricky thing. It’s amazing how many facets there are to this condition, and how many and how varied the techniques for addressing it are, too.

In this blog, I normally focus on spirituality–spiritual practices and spiritual books–that offer help for depression. But there are, of course, a ton of great non-spiritual methods as well. And, as I’ve dealt with depression for most of my life, I’ve tried quite a few of them.

Here’s a list of all of the quick, simple and above all, practical tips (in other words, life hacks) I’ve offered on this blog so far. Some are spiritual, some are secular, some are well-known and some are a bit kooky … but, in my experience, all of them work. At least, they work to some degree. (Even the kooky ones.)

Hopefully you find something helpful here.

150 Life Hacks for Overcoming Depression:

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be a Little Miss Goody-Two-Shoes

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get Rid of Bad Thoughts

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Lose Your Shirt

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Try to Be a Cute Waitress

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Forget Your Memories

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Steal (Yeah, You)

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Be a Good Person

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get in the Flow

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Religious

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Know Your Own Strength

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Know That You Are Holy

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Smell Good

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Get What You Want

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get Some Money

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Believe That It’s Already True

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Feel

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Try to Feel Good

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Feel Guilty for Being Human

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Help People

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get Smart

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Try

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get a Job, Part Two

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Make Work a Game

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get a Job

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Let Your Brain Fool You into Being Unhappy

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get a Religion

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Think Too Hard

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Decide That You’re Wrong

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Get Physical

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get What You Want

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Live in Seattle

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get Happy Books

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Try to Be Happy

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Sometimes, Be Detatched

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Better Than Other People

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Feel Things Deeply

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: You Don’t Have to Love Everyone the Same, But You Might Have to Pretend To

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Choose Your Identity Carefully

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Assume You Need Anything Until You’ve Proven It

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get Some Perspective

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Happiness Is Not a State of Mind

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Lower Your Standards

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Tell Yourself the Truth

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Travel, Even If You Don’t Want To

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Find Out Who You Are and Do It on Purpose

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Know That It’s Not Just You

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Shocking

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get Divorced

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Beware of Middle Age

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Sometimes, Just Give Yourself a Break

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be an Adult; Get Things Done

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Spiritual

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Sing

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Stop the Little Sadness Before It Gets Too Big

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Sometimes, Be Embarrassed

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Figure Out Whose Fault It Is

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Sad

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Cut Your Hair

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Repeat Good Stuff Over and Over in Your Head

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Sometimes, Get Ahead of Yourself

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Fight, Part Two

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Fight

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Pray the Right Way

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Get Mad

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Tell Yourself the Truth, Always

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Read Perspective-changers

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Throw Out the Blueprint

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Pretend to Be Good

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Fall in Love, Part Two

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Fall in Love

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get a Happy Ending

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Get Bored

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Screw Variety. Take the Sure Thing Instead

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Know Yourself

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Being Alone Is Good

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Sometimes, You Have to Look for Love

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Think Deeply and Be Alive

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: You Can Be Whatever You Want to Be

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: You’re Really Good Enough

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Beware of Middle Age

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Expect Change

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Develop a System That Works

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: When You’re Struggling, Admit It

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Apologies are Amazing

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Be Like Other People

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: If He’s Not Your Best Friend, You Have No Chance

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: It’s Wrong to Get Annoyed

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Love Is a Form of Worship

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Always Remember How Lucky You Are

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Say Out Loud What You Need

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Even Atheists Are Kind

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: It’s Okay to Want What You Don’t Have

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Being Married Is Nice . . . But Make Sure You Marry Someone Nice

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: It’s Okay to Be Strange, Part Two

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: It Is So Good To Be Free

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: It’s Okay to Be Strange

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Love Is Just a Feeling

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: It’s Okay to Have Fun

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Fall in Love with Your Brother

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: When It’s True Love, You Have to Turn the Car Around

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Always Remember How Lucky You Are

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Friendship Is Number One

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Love Is Not Art

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Want Too Much

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Settle for Eyes That Don’t Glow

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: It’s Okay To Be Sad

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Love Is All You Need—Sort Of

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Your Instincts Are Probably Right

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: A Time to Try and a Time to Just Let It Happen

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Know That Life is a Game

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Failure Doesn’t Matter

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Give Advice the Right Way

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: You Are Weaker Than You Think

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Normal

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Lower Your Standards

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Caffeine

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Being Alone Is Good

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Strategize

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Life is a Game; Play It On Purpose

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Learn to Love Twitter

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Shop for Friends

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be a Loner

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Do What You’re Afraid To Do

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Read About God

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Worry and Don’t Make Babies

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get Some Friends

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get a Hobby

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Cheat on Your Significant Other, But Pick Up Your Socks

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Find Someone You Never Lie To

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Be a Drag

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be as Intellectually Flexible as You Can Be

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Try

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Spend Money When You’re Happy; Save It When You’re Down

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Your Own Man

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Do Good Deeds

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Expect Too Much

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Play Video Games

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: But, Sometimes, Be Totally Passionate

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Read Great Books

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Get an Addiction

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Try

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Do What You Want to Do, And Nothing Else

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Have Willpower

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Tell Yourself Lies

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: You’re Less Selfish Than You Think

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Make the Fundamental Attribution Error

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Be Awesome

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Buy New Clothes

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Hate Optimists

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Go Outside

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Have Nice Friends

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Sometimes, Just a Shower Will Help

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Learn to Love Rejection

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Don’t Define Your Morality Too Strictly

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Take Medication

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Let People Go That Are Gone

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Make Unreasonable Goals

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: You’re More Negative Than You Think

Life Hack for Overcoming Depression: Smile

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Finally, it happened. After ten years thinking about it, I attempted, as the Apostle Paul once wrote, to “pray without ceasing”–to communicate in an ongoing way with the Divine.

Interested in my results?

Get You’re Getting Closer: One Year of Finding God and a Few Good Friends on Amazon. It’s free.

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