Apologies are amazing (“Alone and Together,” continued)

Three months later, however, a few days after our one-year anniversary, it finally happened: David and I had our first real fight. It happened because we were moving to another place and we didn’t have everything done in time and I was hurrying and I was packing things wrong and he got mad.

He said, “You’re doing it wrong, Mollie. You’re not being careful enough.”

I said, “I told you to pack your things last week but you didn’t, so now I’m doing it my way.”

I didn’t say it nicely, either; I yelled. Then I left the apartment, slamming the door. I walked down the pathway across the street from our house and thought about how angry I was and how unfairly he had treated me. I fumed and walked really fast and cried. Then, about half a mile down the road, I saw David’s car stop in front of me and as soon as I saw it I knew he was sorry and, suddenly, one second later, all of my anger was gone. David got out of the car and hugged me for a long time on the pathway and apologized over and over and I didn’t say anything.

I just cried.

And that was the next very important thing I learned about relationships: I learned what an apology can do.

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